TRAVEL RESOURCES EDUCATION AND SUPPORT

With a little extra preparation and planning, you can go anywhere with your insulin pump or continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system.


TRAVEL SUPPORT FROM MEDTRONIC

If you have technical issues with your Medtronic insulin pump or CGM system, call our 24-hour hotline: 1-800-284-4416.

TRAVEL CHECKLIST

Make sure you have plenty of extra insulin pump supplies in advance of travel. Keep in mind that depending on your insurance and quantity of supplies, it may take up to 14 days to get a supply refill prior to your trip.

Use the following checklist as a guideline to remind you of important items you may need to take:

  • Extra insulin with a current prescription and pharmaceutical labelling
  • Insulin pump reservoirs
  • Insulin pump infusion sets
  • Insertion device for infusion sets
  • CGM transmitter
  • CGM charger
  • Glucose sensors
  • Insertion device for sensors
  • Tapes and adhesives
  • AAA batteries (Energizer® for optimal performance)
  • Blood glucose meter
  • Test strips and lancets
  • Glucose tablets or fast-acting sugar
  • Snacks
  • Ketone strips
  • Medical ID
  • Airport information card
  • Document with current pump settings
  • Insulin syringes for emergency injections and dosing instructions from your doctor

PREPARING TO FLY

It is important that you test your blood glucose (BG) more frequently while you are traveling. The routine hassle of travel, including stress, changes in time zones, schedules and activity levels, meal times and types of food, can all affect your diabetes control. Be extra attentive to monitoring your BG frequently and be prepared to respond if needed.

INSULIN PUMPS AND BLOOD GLUCOSE METERS

When on an airplane, you should go to Utilities > Connect Devices > Meters pump screen, select OFF, and press ACT to unlink your meter from your insulin pump. Manually test your glucose levels using a blood glucose meter.

PERSONAL CGM

If you wear a CGM device, it is typically safe for use on commercial airlines. If questioned by airline personnel about the use of your device, please show them your airport information card. If they still request that you turn off your CGM device, you must comply.

If you are asked to turn off your CGM device, you will have a "data gap" when uploading data into CareLink® Personal Software, where information is missing from the period when your CGM system was turned off.

 


AIRPORT SECURITY GUIDELINES

EQUIPMENT INTERFERENCE

Insulin pumps are designed to withstand common electromagnetic interference, including some airport security systems. Taking an insulin pump through airport security is quite common. It is always a good idea to carry the airport information card (located in the front pocket of your user guide) when you are traveling.

INSULIN PUMPS, PERSONAL CGM, AND SECURITY

  • You can continue to wear your insulin pump or CGM system while going through common security systems such as an airport metal detector as it will not harm the device or trigger an alarm. Do not send the devices through the x-ray machine.
  •  You need to remove your insulin pump and CGM (sensor and transmitter) while going through an airport body scanner. If you do not wish to remove your devices, you may request an alternative pat-down screening process.
  •  Notify security screeners that you have diabetes, that you are wearing an insulin pump and are carrying supplies with you.

 

Information on this site should not be used as a substitute for talking with your doctor. Always talk with your doctor about diagnosis and treatment information.