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  • ECONOMIC VALUE: Reducing procedure times can make hospitals more efficient.

    Economic Value
  • CLINICAL OUTCOMES: Patients who undergo minimally invasive CABG with Medtronic products have shorter hospital stays and return faster to daily living.1 Studies suggest patients who undergo minimally invasive spinal surgery experience less blood loss,4,5 have shorter hospital stays,4,5 and are walking earlier4 than patients who undergo traditional procedures.

    Clinical Outcomes
  • SOCIETAL IMPACT: By making surgeries less invasive, we can help patients get back to being productive members of society faster.

    Societal Impact

Making Our Therapies
Easier On The Human Body

Minimally Invasive Therapies

We've become the industry leader in minimally invasive techniques, which are procedures that are easier for doctors to perform and less disruptive on the human body. Depending on the procedure, the benefits may include shorter procedure time, less blood loss, or faster recovery than with traditional procedures.

We've developed numerous minimally invasive procedures for treating many conditions. Here are 2 specific examples:

Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

Indications, Safety, and Warnings for Tissue
Stabilizer >

We have several minimally invasive techniques for treating coronary artery disease — in which a fatty buildup inside the arteries blocks blood flow to the heart. Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. A common procedure to restore blood flow is called coronary artery bypass grafting, or "CABG" (pronounced "cabbage").

Illustration of traditional CABG
Illustration of minimally invasive CABG

With CABG, a surgeon takes a section of a healthy blood vessel from the patient's leg, chest, or arm and connects it (grafts it) to their coronary artery slightly past the site of the blockage. This creates a new path for blood to flow around (bypass) the blockage in the artery so it can get to the heart.

In traditional off-pump CABG (OPCAB), a large incision is made in the patient's chest. This gives the surgeon access to the heart and is needed to accommodate a stabilization system that keeps the beating heart steady so the surgeon can sew on the replacement blood vessel.

We developed a minimally invasive stabilization system that can be inserted via small incisions on the sides of the chest. The system includes a heart positioner that holds the heart in a position that gives the surgeon access to the blocked arteries, and a tissue stabilizer that holds a small area of the heart still while the surgeon works on it.

Our innovative placement of the stabilization system allows the surgeon to make a much smaller incision near the heart. When this technique and product are combined with our other minimally invasive techniques and products for CABG, the results can be significant. Studies show our minimally invasive procedure results in shorter hospital stays and a faster return to daily living.1

Important Safety Information: Not all patients are candidates for beating heart procedures. Some patients would require cardiopulmonary support during surgery.

Spinal Surgery

As the industry pioneer in minimally invasive spinal procedures, we're continually developing more technologies to enable less-invasive spinal surgeries.

With traditional open spine surgery, surgeons cut or strip back muscles to expose the damaged part of the spine they need to treat. We developed a way to dilate the back muscles and insert a tube into the natural separations of the muscles. This way, surgeons are able to access and treat the damaged portion of the spine through a much smaller incision, to minimize disruption to surrounding tissue.

The benefits of less-invasive procedures include smaller incisions2 and less tissue disruption.3 Studies suggest that patients who undergo minimally invasive spine surgery have experienced less blood loss,4,5 required fewer narcotics after surgery while in the hospital,3,5,6 had shorter hospital stays,4,5 and were walking earlier4 than patients who underwent traditional open spinal fusion surgery.

Spinal surgery illustration

There are some risks associated with minimally invasive spine surgery, including transitioning to a conventional open procedure, neurological damage, damage to the surrounding soft tissue, and, where used, instrument malfunction such as bending, fragmentation, loosening, and/or breakage (whole or partial). Minimally invasive procedures may be associated with longer operative times.



Important Safety Information: Not all patients are candidates for beating heart procedures. Some patients would require cardiopulmonary support during surgery.

Benefit Summary

Medtronic is the industry leader in minimally invasive techniques and we continually work to develop even less disruptive procedures.

  • ECONOMIC VALUE: Reducing procedure times can make hospitals more efficient.
  • CLINICAL OUTCOMES: Patients who undergo minimally invasive CABG with Medtronic products have shorter hospital stays and return faster to daily living.1 Studies suggest patients who undergo minimally invasive spinal surgery experience less blood loss,4,5 have shorter hospital stays,4,5 and are walking earlier4 than patients who undergo traditional procedures.
  • SOCIETAL IMPACT: By making surgeries less invasive, we can help patients get back to being productive members of society faster.

References: 1McGinn JT, Usman S, Lapierre H, Pothula VR, Mesana TG, Ruel M. Minimally invasive coronary artery bypass grafting: dual center experience in 450 consecutive patients. Circulation. 2009; 120:S78-S84. 2Righesso. Comparison of Open Discectomy with Microendoscopic Discectomy in Lumbar Disc Herniations: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial. Neurosurgery. 61:545-549, 2007. 3Khoo, Fessler. Microendoscopic Decompressive Laminotomy for the Treatment of Lumbar Stenosis. Neurosurgery. 51 [Suppl 2]: 146-154, 2002. 4Park, Won Ha. Comparison of one-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion performed with a minimally invasive approach or a traditional open approach. SPINE 32(5):537-543, 2007. 5Isaacs. Minimally invasive microendoscopy-assisted transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion. J. Neurosurg: Spine. 3:98-105, 2005. 6Muramatsu, Hachiya, Morita. Postoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Lumbar Disc Herniation. SPINE. 26(14): 1599-1605, 2001.