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Maximo II Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator

Overview

Maximo® II ICD features a defibrillator function to treat fast heartbeat and pacemaker therapy to detect and correct slow or irregular heart rhythms. Because Maximo II is wireless, routine follow-ups can be scheduled to occur automatically and without your help—even while you are sleeping. Your doctor then receives notices of your condition and the status of your device.

Maximo<sup>®</sup> II ICD

Maximo® II ICD

Features

PainFREE Therapy – Delivers painless electrical pacing pulses called Antitachycardia Pacing (ATP), which may eliminate the need for a shock.

Conexus® Wireless Telemetry – Lets your doctor remotely check your heart device without your assistance. Your device information can be collected and transmitted automatically, even while you are sleeping.

Medtronic CareAlert® Notifications – Monitoring feature set by your doctor. CareAlert Notifications can signal your clinic if your heart condition changes or if your device requires attention (for example, due to decreased battery power). 

Managed Ventricular Pacing® (MVP®) – Provides the best pacing therapy available to reduce unnecessary right ventricle pacing. MVP allows your heart to beat naturally on its own, more often.

Accurate Diagnostic Data – Cardiac Compass® trends and the Heart Failure Management Report let your doctor monitor your heart function, activity and device information. This allows your doctor to see how well your device and medications are working together, and how your heart function may change over time.

Size and Placement

The heart device is surgically placed under the skin, typically below the collarbone. The electrical leads are threaded through a blood vessel into your heart.

Height: 2.52" / 64 mm
Width: 2.01" / 51 mm
Depth: 0.59" / 15 mm

Patient Manuals

icon-pdf Patient Manual for Protecta, Protecta XT, Secura, Maximo® II, and Virtuoso® II models
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Information on this site should not be used as a substitute for talking with your doctor. Always talk with your doctor about diagnosis and treatment information.

Last updated: 27 Mar 2012

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