Benefits of DBS

BENEFITS OF MEDTRONIC DBS

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) helps control your movement symptoms when your medications aren't working as well as they used to. For many people with Parkinson's, DBS makes a difference when even small tasks have become challenging. DBS has helped some people stay as independent as possible and keep doing the activities they love.


BENEFITS OF MEDTRONIC DBS?

85–89% of people with Parkinson’s have clinically meaningful and significant improvement with Medtronic DBS therapy.1

DBS therapy extends the control you already get from your medication for movement symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. Here you can find out about the benefits of DBS therapy and safety considerations. It’s very important to mention that the success of Medtronic DBS depends on:

  • Good candidate selection for DBS therapy. DBS is not for everybody!
  • Good surgical placement of the DBS electrodes.

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UP TO FIVE ADDITIONAL HOURS OF GOOD MOVEMENT WITHOUT DYSKINESIA

UP TO FIVE ADDITIONAL HOURS OF GOOD MOVEMENT WITHOUT DYSKINESIA

Good movement control means no troubling symptoms like shaking, stiffness, and difficulty moving. DBS therapy can provide up to five additional hours of good movement control without dyskinesia per day, compared with medication alone.*2,3,4

What would you do with five additional hours every day?

*Measured by the UPDRS IV

TREATS TREMORS AND RIGIDITY

REDUCES DYSKINESIA AND FLUCTUATIONS

LESS MEDICATION, MORE YOU

IMPROVES QUALITY OF LIFE

IMPROVES ACTIVITIES OF DAILY LIVING

ADJUSTABLE

REVERSIBLE, NOT PERMANENT

WORKS DAY AND NIGHT


Watch DBS in action

These before and after videos show how DBS therapy helps control movement. Please bear in mind that the experiences are specific to these particular people. Responses to the treatment discussed can and do vary and are specific to the individual patient.

Richard's video

Nicky's video

Nicky from the UK Deep Brain Stimulation’s story

This is the story of Nicky, from the UK. The videos shows her before and after the operation. She was diagnosed with Parkinson’s at the age of 27. She couldn’t do anything, brush her teeth, ties her shoes nor take care of her boys. She heard about DBS already long time ago but did not want to think about it. Her medication did not work anymore and the side effect where too difficult to manage. She said she can’t continue and considered DBS. You see Nicky after the operation, 3 months after. It changed her life completely and now she looks as she was supposed to look like normally. She explains the surgery, show the device and really explains that she can live a normal life with her family. Her husband is also saying a few words and compare before and after. If she knew earlier that she would be so good with DBS, she would have done it 10-15 years earlier.
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References

1

Medtronic supplemental analysis: supplement to EPDA website update re patient barriers and claims-v17-Sept-2015

The 'gold standard' of evaluating the success rate of DBS is based on the overall motor function evaluation using the UPDRS III scale. The scientifically accepted method for evaluation of the MCIC (minimally clinically important change) is at least 5 points in the UPDRS III scale. The evaluation of 'off medication' allows reflection of the impact of DBS, albeit an artificially created 'off' condition. It has not been typically reported in the publications, but we have completed the above additional analyses of the databases available in both the published evidence (only randomised control trials have been considered for this). The above analysis works for Medtronic devices only.

2

Deuschl G, Schade-Brittinger C, Krack P, et al. A randomized trial of deep-brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease. NEngl J Med. 2006;355(9):896-908.

3

Okun MS, Foote KD. Parkinson’s disease DBS: what, when, who and why? The time has come to tailor DBS targets. Expert Rev Neurother. 2010 December ; 10(12): 1847–1857.

4

Weaver FM, Follett KA, Stern M, et al. Bilateral deep brain stimulation vs. best medical therapy for patients with advanced Parkinson's disease. JAMA. 2009;301(1):63-73.

5

Schüpbach W, Rau J, Knudsen K, Volkmann J, Krack P, Timmermann L, et al. Neurostimulation for Parkinson’s disease with early motor complications. EARLYSTIM Study. N Eng J Med. 2013;368:610-622.

6

Williams A, Gill S, Varma T, et al. Deep brain stimulation plus best medical therapy versus best medical therapy alone for advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD SURG trial): randomized, open-label trial. Lancet Neurol. 2010;581-591.