IMPACT OF OAB PTNM IN SENIOR LIVING FACILITIES

BLADDER CONTROL ISSUES AFFECT NEARLY 3 OUT OF 4 LONG-TERM CARE RESIDENTS1

Overactive bladder (OAB) is a common condition in the elderly, but it’s not a normal part of aging and it’s treatable.

Long-term care facilities spend significant time helping residents who have incontinence. Typically, this means managing the issue with adult undergarments and timed voiding — rather than treatment.

Why the stakes are higher in senior living facilities

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) F315 requires each resident who is incontinent of urine is identified, assessed, and provided appropriate treatment and services to achieve or maintain as much normal urinary function as possible.2

OAB is an extremely common bladder control condition. And for most people, it is not life-threatening. But for long-term care and assisted living residents, the risks are much more serious. The incontinence that is associated with OAB may cause changes in skin integrity, skin irritation or breakdown, urinary tract infections, falls, fractures, and sleep disturbances, as well as social withdrawal, embarrassment, loss of dignity, and feelings of isolation.2 But it doesn’t have to be this way. Give your residents a new option for more control.


1

Gorina Y, Schappert S, Bercovitz A, et al. Prevalence of incontinence among older Americans. Vital Health Stat 3. 2014;(36):1-33

2

CMS Manual System. Department of Health & Human Services. Dec 2016. Pgs 291-326.