ARE YOU TAKING AN ANTACID BUT STILL HAVING SYMPTOMS?

If you're taking antacids for GERD but still experiencing symptoms, you may have something other than GERD.1,2 The only way to know for sure is to get tested.

FIND A SPECIALIST
Man leans over edge of bed to take pills while woman next to him sleeps.

ANTACIDS CAN IMPACT YOUR HEALTH

Like any medication, antacids can have side effects or negatively impact your health.3,4 Studies have found an association between antacid use and osteoporosis, dementia, bone fractures, gastric polyps, and certain types of infections.3,4

One in three people taking antacids and still having reflux symptoms don't have GERD.5,6 If that's you, then you may be able to stop taking antacids entirely and avoid these potential complications.2

SYMPTOMS AREN'T ENOUGH TO DIAGNOSE GERD

The Bravo™ reflux testing system helps your physician determine whether or not you have GERD by measuring acidity in your esophagus.7 Following reflux testing, 50% of patients may stop or avoid antacid use.8

Testing involves placing a small capsule in your esophagus that collects data on your acid reflux for up to four days. 2 The data is sent to a small, wearable device that you carry with you during normal activities.

LEARN MORE ABOUT REFLUX TESTING
Male patient wearing Bravo recorder speaking to his doctor.

FIND A PHYSICIAN

Find a doctor in your area who specializes in testing for GERD using the Bravo system.

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Information and resources on this site should not be used as a substitute for medical advice from your doctor. Always discuss diagnosis and treatment information including risks with your doctor. Keep in mind that all treatment and outcome results are specific to the individual patient. Results may vary.


1

Gawon A, Pandolfino J. Ambulatory Reflux Monitoring in GERD - Which Test Should be Performed and Should Therapy be Stopped? Curr Gastroenterol Rep. 2013 Apr;15(4):316

2

Richter JE, Pandolfino JE, Vela MF, Kahrilas PJ, Lacy BE, Ganz R, et al. Utilization of wireless pH monitoring technologies: a summary of the proceedings from the Esophageal Diagnostic Working Group. Diseases of the Esophagus. 2013 Nov;26(8):755-65

3

Vakil N. Prescribing proton pump inhibitors: is it time to pause and rethink? Drugs. 2012 Mar 5;72(4):437-45

4

Freedberg., Kim, Yang. The Risks and Benefits of Long-term Use of Proton Pump Inhibitors: Expert Review and Best Practice Advice From the American Gastroenterological Association. Gastroenterology 2017;152:706-715

5

Vaezi M, Zehrai A, Yuksel E, Testing for refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease, ASGE Leading Edge, 2012 Vol 2, No 2, 1-13, American Society Gastroenterology Endoscopy, Page 1.

6

Herregods, T.V.K., et al. Patients with refractory reflux symptoms often do not have GERD: Neurogastroenterology & Motility. 2015;27(9): 1267-1273

7

Hirano I, Zhang Q, Pandolfino JE, Kahrilas PJ. Four Day Bravo pH Capsule Monitoring With and Without Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy. Clin Gastroenterol & Hepatol 2005;3:1083-1088

8

Triadafilopoulos G, Zikos T, Regalia K, et al. Use of Esophageal pH Monitoring to Minimize Proton-Pump Inhibitor Utilization in Patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux Symptoms. Digestive Diseases And Sciences. 2018;63(10):2673-2680. doi:10.1007/s10620-018-5183-4.