SYMPTOMS OF GERD

Acid reflux is considered GERD if moderate to severe symptoms occur once a week.

To know for sure if these are symptoms of GERD, consult a gastroenterologist (GI).

TRACK YOUR SYMPTOMS

Use this printable form to track your heartburn, reflux, and related symptoms — then share the results with your doctor.

 

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RISK OF PROGRESSION

Difficulty swallowing, heartburn, regurgitation, and other symptoms of GERD are not only uncomfortable, they may signify a more serious condition.3

Without intervention, 26.5% of chronic GERD patients may develop a precancerous condition called Barrett's esophagus.4

Graphic illustrating that up to 26.5% of GERD patients may develop Barrett's esophagus in their lifetime.

ASSESS YOUR RISK

Complete this short risk assessment quiz to understand your risk level for Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal cancer. Share the results with your doctor at your next appointment.

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BARRETT'S ESOPHAGUS AND ESOPHAGEAL CANCER

Barrett’s is the primary risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma.5,6,7 Untreated Barrett's esophagus can increase your risk of developing this form of cancer by 50 times or more.5,7, 8,9

If detected early, it's possible to treat Barrett’s esophagus and reduce your risk for esophageal adenocarcinoma.10, 11


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LEARN MORE ABOUT GERD

Find downloadable educational materials and frequently asked questions about GERD.

SEE RESOURCES

Information and resources on this site should not be used as a substitute for medical advice from your doctor. Always discuss diagnosis and treatment information including risks with your doctor. Keep in mind that all treatment and outcome results are specific to the individual patient. Results may vary.

1

Shaheen N, RansohoffDF. Gastroesophageal reflux, Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal cancer. JAMA. 2002;287:1972-81.

2

Dymedex Market Development Consulting, Strategic Market Assessment, GERD, October 30, 2014. References 1-3, 6-15, 22, 23, 25, and 34 from the full citation list, access at http://www.medtronic.com/giclaims.

3

Vaezi M, Zehrai A, Yuksel E. Testing for refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease. ASGE Leading Edge. 2012;2(2):1-13. American Society Gastroenterology Endoscopy, Pages 1-4.

4

Dymedex Market Development Consulting, Strategic Market Assessment, GERD, October 30, 2014. References .1-3, 6-15, 22, 23, 25, and 34 from the full citation list, access at http://www.medtronic.com/giclaims.

5

De Jonge PJ, van Blankenstein M, Looman CW, Casparie MK, Meijer GA, Kuipers EJ. Risk of malignant progression in patients with Barrett’s oesophagus: a Dutch nationwide cohort study. Gut. 2010;59:1030-6

6

Pohl H, Welch G et al. The role of over diagnosis and reclassification in the marked increase of esophageal adenocarcinoma incidence. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2005;97:142-6.

7

Hvid-Jensen F, Pedersen L, Drewes AM, Sorensen HT, Funch-Jensen P. Incidence of adenocarcinoma among patients with Barrett’s esophagus. N Engl J Med. 2011;365:1375-83

8

Gilbert EW et al. Barrett’s esophagus: a review of the literature. J Gastrointest Surg. 2011;15:708-1.

9

Wani S, Falk G, Hall M, Gaddam S, Wang A, Gupta N, et al. Patients with nondysplastic Barrett’s esophagus have low risks for developing dysplasia or esophageal adenocarcinoma. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2011;9(3):220-7.

10

Orman ES, Li N, Shaheen NJ. Efficacy and durability of radiofrequency ablation for Barrett's esophagus: systematic review and meta-analysis. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2013;11:1245-55.

11

PhoaKN, van Vilsteren FG, Pouw RE, Weusten BL, et al. Radiofrequency ablation vs endoscopic surveillance for patients with Barrett esophagus and low-grade dysplasia: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA. 2014 Mar 26;311(12):1209-17.