WHAT IS A STROKE?

A stroke or a “brain attack” is a sudden interruption in the brain’s blood supply. When the blood supply is interrupted, your brain no longer gets the oxygen and nutrients it needs, therefore, causing brain cells to die by the minute.²

According to the World Health Organization, stroke is the 2nd leading cause of death and 3rd leading cause of disability worldwide.³

Stroke Facts infographic. Download PDF in section below this image.
Woman wearing drawn-on cape.

heroes don't hesitate

Every minute a stroke goes untreated up to 2 million neurons can be destroyed.⁸ This is why it is necessary to act F.A.S.T at the first signs of stroke. Recognizing the signs of stroke and getting fast access to treatment is vital in saving lives. This could also improve outcomes for stroke survivors.  

What people need to know is how to act F.A.S.T. and by learning and sharing the F.A.S.T. warning signs, you just might save a life from stroke.

FAST stroke signs graphic which outlines the 4 primary symptoms of a stroke

KNOW YOUR RISK STROKE RISKOMETER

The Stroke Riskometer is a World Stroke Organization™ endorsed mobile app that helps you to understand your stroke risk and will help you to identify the changes you can make to reduce your risk. 






For more information visit strokeriskometer.com

Download the Stroke Riskometer at the App Store or Google Play Download the Stroke Riskometer at App Store Download the Stroke Riskometer at Google Play

   

Stroke riskometer home screen and results screen image

HOW IS ACUTE ISCHEMIC STROKE TREATED?

There are several ways acute ischemic stroke can be treated by either removing or dissolving a clot.⁹

MEDICAL MANAGEMENT

An intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is often used to break up clots and works best when used soon after the stroke occurs.¹⁰

MECHANICAL THROMBECTOMY

For larger, more complex clots, you can undergo a minimally invasive procedure known as mechanical thrombectomy, where a device is used to remove the clot.¹⁰

PHYSICIANS WHO TREAT STROKE ARE ADAPTING TO COVID-19

If you suspect you, or someone with you, is having a stroke please don’t stay at home.

Because of the COVID-19 pandemic there may be a drop in numbers of patients admitted to hospitals with stroke symptoms. Recognizing the signs of stroke and receiving emergency medical attention saves lives and improves the outcomes for stroke patients. A stroke is still a hospital emergency and must be treated urgently. If you recognize the warning signs please don't stay at home.

Here are some examples of how hospitals are prepared to treat those experiencing stroke as safely as possible.

PATIENT STORY

BEHIND EVERY STROKE SURVIVOR IS A TEAM OF HEROES

Friends, medical team and even the Kansas City Chiefs were Bill Martin's action heroes.

Bill Martin, 54, credits his beloved Kansas City Chiefs as heroes for saving his life. A lifelong superfan and season ticket holder at the time, he was about to enter the iconic Arrowhead Stadium for last year’s game against rival Las Vegas (formerly Oakland) Raiders. Just as Mr. Martin entered the stadium, he lost his balance and fell. Fortunately for Mr. Martin, his friends and other bystanders, also heroes, jumped into action, recognizing he was having a stroke. They called 911 and Mr. Martin was rushed to Saint Luke's Marion Bloch Neuroscience Institute where he was met by another team of superheroes. There at the Kansas City hospital they made the diagnosis that Mr. Martin was having a major stroke due to a blood clot in the brain. The hospital used a unique interventional technology, which doesn’t require open surgery of the brain, to remove the blood clot from Mr. Martin’s brain and restore blood flow to the blocked blood vessel. Within a short time following his procedure, Mr. Martin was alert and awake to cheer on his favorite team during the final quarter of the Chiefs vs Raiders game while watching TV from his hospital recovery room.

 

 

Closeup of older man.
World Stroke Organization
Medtronic
1

https://www.world-stroke.org/world-stroke-day-campaign/why-stroke-matters/learn-about-stroke

2

About Stroke. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.stroke.org/en/about-stroke 2 Johnson, W., Onuma, O., Owolabi, M., & Sachdev, S. (2016).

3

Stroke: a global response is needed. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 94(9), 634-634A. https://doi.org/10.2471/blt.16.181636

4

https://www.world-stroke.org/world-stroke-day-campaign/why-stroke-matters Toth G, Cerejo R. Intracranial aneurysms: review of current science and management. Vasc Med. 2018;23(3):276-288

5

https://www.world-stroke.org/world-stroke-day-campaign/why-stroke-matters/stroke-prevention

6

https://www.cdc.gov/stroke/facts.htm

7

https://www.world-stroke.org/assets/downloads/Top10_Infographic_Year2.png

8

Saver, Jeffrey. (2006). Time Is Brain – Quantifed. Stroke; a journal of cerebral circulation. 37.263-6. 10.1161/01.STR.0000196957.55928/ab.

9

Ischemic Stroke Treatment. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.stroke.org/en/about-stroke/treatment/ischemic-stroketreatment

10

www.stroke.org. 2020. Ischemic Stroke Treatment. [online] Available at: [Accessed 18 May 2020]