GI BLEEDING GASTROINTESTINAL & HEPATOLOGY SOLUTIONS

DIAGNOSING GI BLEEDING

GI bleeding should be suspected in patients who present with anemia, melena, or hematochezia.1 Every year, 4.4 million patients in the U.S., present with suspected GI bleeding, but up to 10% remain undiagnosed following EGD/colonoscopy.2,3

PILLCAM SB 3 SYSTEM

PillCam SB 3 System on white background with logo

The PillCam™ SB 3 system allows physicians to efficiently visualize the small bowel with a less invasive, patient-friendly procedure. GI society guidelines, including ACG, AGA, and ASGE, recommend capsule endoscopy as the first line diagnostic test for suspected small bowel bleeding.1,4,5 Capsule endoscopy helps to identify the source of GI bleeding 70% of the time after a negative upper and lower examination.4

1

American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE). The role of endoscopy in the management of obscure GI bleeding. Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. 2010; 72(3): 471-479.

2

Zhu A, Kaneshiro M, Kaunitz J. Evaluation and treatment of iron deficiency anemia: a gastroenterological perspective. Digestive Disease Sciences. 2010;55:548-559.

3

Internal Data–Internal Market Model. July, 2015. Data on file.

4

Raji GS, Gerson L, Das A, Lewis B. American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) Institute Technical Review on obscure gastrointestinal bleeding.Gastroenterology. 2007;133:1697-1717.

5

Gerson LB, Fidler JL, Cave DR, Leighton JA. ACG Clinical Guideline: Diagnosis and management of small bowel bleeding. Am J Gastroenterol. 2015;110(9):1265-1287.

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Images do not represent all components of the system.