TOO COMMON TO DENY

Millions of people are living with bladder and bowel control problems.

Graph of adults dealing with OAB or FI.

INDICATED CONDITIONS

Sacral neuromodulation (SNM) delivered by the InterStimTM system is indicated for patients who have failed or could not tolerate more conservative treatments for one or more of the following conditions: overactive bladder, or OAB, (urge incontinence or urgency-frequency), non-obstructive urinary retention, and chronic fecal incontinence (FI).

Women enjoying time outdoors while eating ice cream.

BLADDER CONTROL CANDIDATES

Many patients with OAB or retention have poor or reduced quality of life because of their symptoms. These patients are considered suitable for the InterStim™ system once they have failed or could not tolerate more conservative treatments.

This therapy is appropriate for bladder control patients who:

  • Experience urge incontinence or urgency-frequency
  • Experience urinary retention without an obstruction
  • Need another option if medication does not provide symptom relief and/or causes unpleasant side effects
  • Want an alternative to repeated injections

This therapy is not appropriate for bladder control patients who:

  • Experience primarily stress incontinence
  • Have not demonstrated an appropriate response to the InterStim™/therapy evaluation
  • Are unable to operate mobile devices (such as the smart programmer for the InterStim™ system)
  • Are not appropriate candidates for surgery
  • Experience retention due to obstructions (such as BPH, cancer, or urethral stricture)

BOWEL CONTROL CANDIDATES

Many patients with chronic FI have poor or reduced quality of life because of their symptoms. These patients are considered suitable for the InterStim™ system if they have failed (or are not candidates for) more conservative treatments such as medication, behavior modifications, bowel retraining, and/or pelvic muscle training.

This therapy is most appropriate for bowel control patients who:

  • Have frequent bowel accidents
  • Experience urge incontinence and/or passive incontinence
  • Need another option if medication that does not provide symptom relief and/or causes unpleasant side effects

This therapy is not appropriate for bowel control patients who:

  • Have not demonstrated an appropriate response to the InterStim™/therapy evaluation
  • Have issues using mobile devices (such as the smart programmer for the InterStim™ system)
  • Are not appropriate candidates for surgery

Safety and effectiveness of the InterStim™ system for bladder and bowel control candidates has not been established for:

  • Bilateral stimulation
  • Pregnancy, unborn fetus, and delivery
  • Pediatric use under the age of 16 (for bladder control) or 18 (for bowel control)
  • Patients with neurological disease origins

PURSUE ONLINE EDUCATION

Take convenient courses specifically designed for clinicians treating patients with OAB, non- obstructive urinary retention, and chronic FI.

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REAL PEOPLE, REAL RELIEF

Hear from actual patients who achieve life-changing relief using the Medtronic InterStimTM system.

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EXPECT EXTENSIVE SUPPORT

Get your questions answered and your concerns resolved.

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REACH THE NEXT LEVEL

Resources and support practices can use to improve efficiency and find opportunities for growth.

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Support for Bladder patients

Our patient campaigns provide helpful education and resources, so patients stay informed and engaged throughout their journey to relief.

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Support for Bowel patients

Our patient campaigns provide helpful education and resources, so patients stay informed and engaged throughout their journey to relief.

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1

Stewart WF, Van Rooyen JB, Cundiff GW, et al. World J Urol. 2003;20(6):327-336.

2

United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division (2011). World Population Prospects: The 2010 Revision, CD-ROM Edition.

3

United States Quick Facts. United States Census Bureau web site. Available at: https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/table/PST045215/00. Accessed January 27, 2017.

4

Whitehead WE, Borrud L, Goode PS, et al. Fecal Incontinence in US adults: epidemiology and risk factors. Gastroenterology. 2009;137(2):512-517.