MAINTAIN YOUR MOMENTUM

Maintenance therapy is an essential part of Medtronic bladder control therapy delivered by the NURO™ system. Each session is exactly the same as the first 12. The only difference is they are scheduled once every three to four weeks.

Talk to your doctor to figure out the schedule that works best for you.

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TRACK YOUR SYMPTOMS

If you ever feel like your level of relief is changing, track your symptoms and make an appointment to talk to your doctor.

GET A DIARY
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FAQ FOR THE NUROTM SYSTEM

Q: WHAT DOES THE STIMULATION FEEL LIKE?

A: The sensation should not be painful, although you may feel a slight tingling in your heel. You'll be free to read, listen to music, or use your phone during your maintenance therapy sessions.

Q: WHAT IS MAINTENANCE THERAPY?

A: Following your initial treatment of 12 weekly, 30-minute sessions, you can continue with maintenance therapy.1 When you are on maintenance therapy, treatments occur every three to four weeks rather than every week. These sessions are exactly the same as the first 12, and can be scheduled at a time that is convenient for you.

Q: WHAT IF THIS THERAPY IS NOT THE ANSWER?

A: If PTNM stops providing the relief you need, rest assured it is not the only option. Ask your doctor if Medtronic bladder control therapy delivered by the InterStim™ system could work for you.

 

Real people, Real Relief

See how actual patients have reduced their symptoms and enjoyed getting their lives back.

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Share YOUR STORY 

Did you know 44% of people with bladder control issues are too embarrassed to talk to a doctor?2 Help end the stigma by sharing your story in your local community.

Learn how

While the NURO™ device was not used in these studies, since it delivers equivalent stimulation therapy as the device used in the studies, a user can expect similar performance.

1

Peters KM, Carrico DJ, Wooldridge LS, et al. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation for the long-term treatment of overactive bladder: 3-year results of the STEP study. J Urol. 2013;189(6):2194-2201.

2

Leede Research, “Views on OAB: A Study for the National Association of Continence.” December 16, 2015.

Information on this site should not be used as a substitute for talking with your doctor. Always talk with your doctor about diagnosis and treatment information.