Multiple Daily Injections Insulin Therapy

WHAT IS mULTIPLE DAILY INJECTION (MDI) THERAPY?

Multiple daily injection (MDI) insulin therapy typically consists of three or more injections per day. This includes one injection of long-acting insulin in the evening and an injection of rapid- or short-acting insulin before each meal.

LONG- VERSUS SHORT-ACTING INSULIN

Long-acting insulin is designed to release slowly and evenly in the bloodstream for about 24 hours after it is injected. It acts like the background insulin in a person without diabetes.

Rapid- or short-acting insulin acts like the insulin released around mealtimes in a person without diabetes. This insulin is injected before meals. The amount of insulin taken should be adjusted to match the food in the meal, using the insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio.

 Closeup of woman giving herself an insulin injection in her abdomen.

ALTERNATIVES TO MDI

To keep blood glucose levels in the target range and to reduce the risk of complications, accurate doses of insulin need to be delivered to the body. A couple different technolgies accomplish this.

INSULIN PUMP
TECHNOLOGY

Insulin pumps can continuously release small amounts of insulin, like the pancreas, and replace the need for frequent injections by delivering precise doses of rapid-acting insulin.

LEARN ABOUT INSULIN PUMPS
Pump on torso

SENSOR AUGMENTED TECHNOLOGY

There are three main components to sensor augmented technology: a “smart” insulin pump, a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system, and technology management software. In some cases, the delivery of insulin can be modified by continuous glucose readings.

Learn ABOUT THIS TECHNOLOGY
Close up of CGM sensor on woman's abdomen.

Information on this site should not be used as a substitute for talking with your doctor. Always talk with your doctor about diagnosis and treatment information.