ROBOTIC-ASSISTED SURGERY: EXPANDING CAPABILITIES.

pdf Robotic-Assisted Surgery (.pdf)

Robotic-assisted surgery (RAS) has been identified as an emerging medical technology with the potential to help standardize surgical procedures and enable minimally invasive surgery (MIS).

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An animated image that rotates through the benefits of robotic-assisted surgery — smaller incisions, decreased blood loss, shorter hospital stays, and lower incidence of some surgical complications.

Robotic-assisted surgery (RAS) is opening new frontiers for doctors — from improving precision and accuracy in spine surgery, to more access and maneuverability in general surgery.1-3

RAS is poised for strong adoption in the OR suite. However, as with any new medical technology, factors such as initial and per-procedure costs, along with surgeon training may impact the speed at which RAS can be implemented and benefits realized.

Decorative element

At Medtronic, we are working to advance RAS solutions, recognizing that the most comprehensive solutions must:

  • Combine the latest technology with flexible models across several disease states
  • Provide the best clinical and training support
  • Expand based on technological advances and the evolving needs of health systems

“Our goal is to use innovation to help standardize procedures and improve patient outcomes,” says Megan Rosengarten, general manager and vice president of Surgical Robotics for the Medtronic Minimally Invasive Therapies Group. “It’s not about adding technology because we can, it’s about using technology to create better clinical and economic options for hospitals, surgeons, and patients.”

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1

Hussain A, Malik A, Halim MU, Ali AM. The use of robotics in surgery: a review. Int J Clin Pract. 2014;68:1376-1382.

2

2 Albani JM. The role of robotics in surgery: a review. Mo Med. 2007;104:166-172.

3

Hyun SJ, Kim KJ, Jahng TA, Kim HJ. Minimally invasive robotic versus open fluoroscopic-guided spinal instrumented fusions: a randomized controlled trial. Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2017;42(6):353–358.