1. DIFFERENTIATE ARTERIAL &
VENOUS ULCERS

Ulcer appearance, medical history, and physical exam should be used for differential diagnosis.

Image of arterial ulcer
Image of venous ulcer

Characteristic

Arterial Ulcer

Venous Ulcer

Location

Toes or foot

Malleolus or metatarsal

Appearance

Irregular margin, cool cyanotic

Typically sloped edges, may have exudate, irregular shape

Foot Temperature

Cold

Warm

Pain

Usually severe

Mild

Sensation

Variable, often decreased

Present, variable (pain, temperature)

Arterial Pulses

Absent

Present, variable (pain, temperature)

Veins

Collapsed

Dilated, varicosities, edema

2. IDENTIFY VENOUS
REFLUX

Comprehensive venous duplex ultrasound examination of the lower extremity should be performed in all patients with a suspected venous leg ulcer.1

See Guidelines

Illustration showing normal superficial vein

NORMAL VEIN

Valves ensure blood flows
in one direction

Illustration showing diseased superficial vein

DISEASED VEIN

Valves that cannot close allow blood to drain and pool

3. TREAT WITH EARLY ENDOVENOUS ABLATION

See our CVI Portfolio

Image of VenaSeal Closure System

VenaSeal

Closure System

Image of ClosureFast Radiofrequency Ablation System

ClosureFast

Radiofrequency Ablation System

Reference

1

O’Donnell TF Jr, Passman MA, Marston WA, et al. Management of venous leg ulcers: Clinical Practice Guidelines of the Society for Vascular Surgery® and the American Venous Forum. J Vasc Surg. August 2014;60(2 Suppl):3S-59S.