PREVALENCE IS RISING1

Millions of people are living with bladder and bowel control problems. These issues can seriously affect quality of life, including work, relationships, and activities.2,3 In other words, there are people in your community who need help from specialists like you.

 

 

Human outlines stating 1 in 6 adults have OAB and 1 in 12 has FI.

CHALLENGES PERSIST

Despite the widespread prevalence of bladder and bowel control problems, people with these conditions often go years without talking to a doctor due to embarrassment and social stigma.8 Many of those who do seek help find little to no relief from lifestyle changes or medications.9, 10

 

 

Human outlines stating 44% of people are embarrassed by bladder control problems.

TAKE A CLOSER LOOK AT NEUROMODULATION

For bladder and bowel control patients who do not respond to conservative treatments, neuromodulation offers a proven way to reduce symptoms. Neuromodulation therapies from Medtronic are backed by extensive clinical evidence along with the experience of hundreds of thousands of patients.

 

 

 

 

Understand THE INDICATIONS

Learn the parameters of patient selection for bladder control and bowel control.

VIEW TOOLS
Doctor speaking with female pelvic health patient

SHOW PATIENTS THE WAY

The Care Pathway helps visualize the journey to relief, so patients keep moving forward.

DOWNLOAD THE RESOURCES
Outline of a person pointing at neuromodulation therapies and education

EDUCATE YOUR PATIENTS

Explore patient-friendly materials about our neuromodulation therapies.

VISIT PATIENT WEBSITE
Females outside discussing the Medtronic care pathway for urinary retention.
Female Pelvic Health Physician

PURSUE ONLINE EDUCATION

Take convenient courses specifically designed for clinicians treating patients with OAB, non-obstructive urinary retention, and chronic FI.

SEE COURSES

CONNECT WITH MEDTRONIC

Receive updates about our therapies, practice management, and other important topics.

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1

Irwin DE, Kopp ZS, Agatep B, Milsom I, Abrams P. Worldwide prevalence estimates of lower urinary tract symptoms, overactive bladder, urinary incontinence and bladder outlet obstruction. BJU Int. 2011;108:1132-1138.

2

Coyne KS, Payne C, et al. The impact of urinary urgency and frequency on health-related quality of life in overactive bladder: results from a national community survey. Value Health. 2004; 7(4): 455-463.

3

Damon H, Guye O, Seigneurin A et al. Prevalence of anal incontinence in adults and impact on quality-of-life. Gastroenterol Clin Biol. 2006;30(1):37-43.

4

Stewart WF, Van Rooyen JB, Cundiff GW, et al. World J Urol. 2003;20(6):327-336.

5

United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division (2011). World Population Prospects: The 2010 Revision, CD-ROM Edition.

6

United States Quick Facts. United States Census Bureau website. Available at: https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/table/PST045215/00. Accessed January 27, 2017.

7

Whitehead WE, Borrud L, Goode PS, et al. Fecal Incontinence in US adults: epidemiology and risk factors. Gastroenterology. 2009;137(2):512-517.

8

Muller N.  What Americans understand and how they are affected by bladder control problems: highlights of recent nationwide consumer research. Urol Nurs. 2005;25(2): 109-115.

9

Gormley EA, Lightner DJ, Burgio KL, et al. Diagnosis and treatment of overactive bladder (non-neurogenic) in adults: AUA/SUFU guideline. American Urological Association (AUA). J Urol. 2015 May;193(5):1572-80.

10

Wald A, Bharucha AE, Cosman BC, et al.  ACG clinical guideline: management of benign anorectal disorders. Am J Gastroenterol. 2014 Aug;109(8):1141-1157.

11

Views on Over Active Bladder; A study for NAFC. Leede Research. December 16, 2015.