Symptoms SACROILIAC JOINT DYSFUNCTION

About the Sacroiliac Joint

Every time you stand erect, thank your sacroiliac (SI) joints. These two joints work hard; they connect your spine to your pelvis, support your upper body, and act as a shock absorber. Yet they don’t get much attention — that is, until they start to hurt.

Bone Model Demonstration - SI Joint Anatomy

Using a bone model of the pelvis, Dr. Carter Beck shows the location of the SI joint, between the sacrum and the ilium. It connects the pelvis with the spine. Dr. Beck is a neurological surgeon at Montana Neurosurgical Specialists in Missoula, Montana.
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Sacroiliac Joint Pain Symptoms

When you have sacroiliac joint disease, you are likely to have pain in your leg, buttocks, groin, or lower back. The pain can occur when you stand up, walk, sit, or sleep. In short, SI joint pain can make you miserable.

Common Symptoms Associated with SI Joint Pain

Dr. Carter Beck describes the symptoms commonly associated with SI joint pain, such as pain in the hip and buttocks. Dr. Beck is a neurological surgeon at Montana Neurosurgical Specialists in Missoula, Montana.
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Normal wear and tear of the joint, trauma, and inflammation can lead to painful walking, sitting, sleeping, getting in and out of a car, and other activities.

Typical Patient Experiencing SI Joint Pain

Dr. David Rouben shares his perspective on the majority of patients who come to him with SI joint pain. Dr. Rouben is an orthopedic surgeon at Norton Spine Specialists in Louisville, Kentucky.
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Although it is not always clear what causes sacroiliac pain, it is estimated that 15%-25% of patients with axial low back pain can attribute their pain to the SI joint.1

Classic Location of SI Joint Pain

Dr. David Rouben shows the two locations that point to the sacroiliac joint as a potential source of low back pain. Dr. Rouben is an orthopedic surgeon at Norton Spine Specialists in Louisville, Kentucky.
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Conditions Causing Sacroiliac Joint Disease

Sacroiliac joint disease typically results from one of two conditions:

  • Inflammation of the SI joint, called “degenerative sacroiliitis”
  • Too much or too little motion in the SI joint, known as “sacroiliac joint disruption”

1

Cohen, Steven P. Sacroiliac Joint Pain: A Comprehensive Review of Anatomy, Diagnosis, and Treatment. Anesth Analg2005;101:1440-1453.