GETTING DBS: WHAT TO EXPECT DBS THERAPY FOR OCD

WHAT TO EXPECT IF YOU CHOOSE DBS

You're probably wondering what to expect if you choose deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder.* Along the way, you’ll have the support and expertise of a psychiatrist, neurosurgeon, and a clinician who have training and experience with DBS.

Part of your healthcare team's job is to make sure you're comfortable and satisfied with your therapy. Always ask for clarification if there's something you don't understand. Also, make sure to communicate any concerns you may have regarding the procedure or follow-up treatment.

Remember: You'll get the best results from your therapy by actively participating in discussions with the members of your healthcare team.

1. EVALUATION — DETERMINING IF YOU ARE A CANDIDATE

Your psychiatrist will evaluate you to see if DBS is a good treatment option for you.

DBS may be right for you if you:

  • Have a diagnosis of OCD with a documented duration of at least 5 years
  • Have OCD rated as severe or extreme illness
  • Have depression and anxiety
  • Have failed to improve following treatment with at least three selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)
  • Are 18 years old or older

The doctor will share the results with you, and together you will decide whether to go forward with the therapy.

Learn more about the criteria for deep brain stimulation therapy for OCD to determine whether you may be a suitable candidate.

2. PLANNING — PREPARING FOR SURGERY

Your doctor will create images and maps of your brain to help guide the placement of leads during the surgery. You will have an MRI or CT scan to capture images of your brain.

3. SURGERY — PLACING THE SYSTEM

There are two parts to the DBS surgery: implanting very thin wires (leads) in the brain and placing the pacemaker-like device, called the neurostimulator, under the skin of the chest. The two parts may be done on the same day, or two different days. 

4. PROGRAMMING — STIMULATION SETTINGS    

Medtronic neurostimulator product family

A few weeks later, your doctor will turn on the neurostimulator and adjust the stimulation to best control your symptoms while minimizing side effects.

  • It will take a few programming sessions to find the stimulation levels that work best for you.
  • You'll have follow-up visits to check your results and adjust as needed. These appointments are key to getting the results you want over time.

5. CONTINUOUS THERAPY

Over time, your doctor will adjust the therapy settings in your device to meet your specific needs. Individualized therapy settings are programmed in the clinic using wireless communication between the implanted device and a clinician programmer. Every individual is different, so programming optimization may take place over several months to find the settings that best reduce your seizures and potential side effects.

Always follow your doctor's guidance about which activities are okay and which to avoid.

6. CHECKUPS — ONGOING CARE

It's extremely important to attend all of your checkups with the doctor who manages your DBS therapy. Your doctor will:

  • Make sure that your DBS system is working properly
  • Adjust your stimulation to best control your symptoms 
  • Check the battery of your neurostimulator to see if you will soon need a device replacement.

INSURANCE COVERAGE

The total cost of Reclaim™ DBS Therapy for OCD may vary significantly. Please contact your healthcare provider for an estimate of the costs associated with Reclaim DBS Therapy for OCD.

Coverage for Reclaim DBS Therapy is typically made on a case-by-case basis by Medicare, Medicaid and private payers. Humanitarian Device Exemption products are eligible for Medicare coverage if the treatment is provided by a site that has Institutional Review Board approval. Please contact your insurance company to see if your health plan provides coverage.


Information on this site should not be used as a substitute for talking with your doctor. Always talk with your doctor about diagnosis and treatment information.


*

Humanitarian Device: Authorized by Federal (U.S.A.) law for use as an adjunct to medications and as an alternative to anterior capsulotomy for treatment of chronic, severe, treatment-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in adult patients who have failed at least three selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). The effectiveness of this device for this use has not been demonstrated.