Treatment Options

 

 

 

Understanding obesity treatment

Obesity management, like the disease itself, is complex and challenging.8 Managing it successfully for the long term is not as simple as reducing energy intake and increasing energy expended. Your body senses weight loss, and actively works to return you to your starting weight6,8

Despite your best efforts, your body senses weight loss and actively works to return you to your starting weight.8,14 Your body does this in two ways. First, the amount of energy your body uses (when resting or exercising) becomes less than would be expected, based on your weight and body composition.8,9 This change persists for years, even if you regain the weight you have lost.9 Secondly, changes to the hormones which control your hunger and fullness work to push your weight back up.8

Weight loss has substantial health benefits for people with obesity, such as reducing the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and heart disease and reducing the risk of death from any causes.18,19

Calculate your Body Mass Index (BMI)

Body mass index, or BMI, is a calculation based on your height and weight to place you in a weight category: underweight, normal weight, overweight, or obese.6,14,24

BMI is a very general measure that places you in 1 of 6 broad weight categories – underweight, normal weight, overweight, obese.25

cm
kg

Your BMI is 40.0 which indicates you're in the obese category.Please consult your doctor to discuss your results and potential weight loss treatment options.

BMI classes and comorbidity risks25

Classification BMI Risk of Comorbidities

Underweight

Less than 18

Increased

Normal weight

18 – 25

Low

Overweight

25-30

Increased

Obese I

30-35

Moderate

Obese II

35-40

Severe

Obese III

40 or greater

Very severe

Did you know?

Despite your best efforts, your body senses weight loss and actively works to return you to your starting weight.

Changes to the hormones which control your hunger and fullness work to push your weight back up.8,9,10

 

The amount of energy your body uses (when resting or exercising) becomes less than would be expected, based on your weight and body composition.8

This change persists for years, even if you regain the weight you have lost.8

It makes sense to seek help from your doctor.3,10,14,27

Because obesity is a disease with many different causes and it increases your risk of developing other medical conditions.3,10,14,27

Weight loss has substantial health benefits for people with obesity.18,24

These benefits include reducing the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and heart disease and reducing the risk of death from any cause.18,24

Your doctor can assess a wide range of things that may be influencing your health.15,25

Together you can then decide on the best approach for you to lose weight and improve your health.15,25

References

3. Caterson I, et al. Gaps to bridge: Misalignment between perception, reality and actions in obesity, Diabetes Obes Metab 2019

6. RACP. Action to prevent obesity and reduce its impact across the life course – Evidence Review. 2018. Available at https://www.racp.edu.au/docs/default-source/advocacy-library/racp-obesity-position-statement.pdf

8. Sumithran P and Proietto J. The defence of body weight: a physiological basis for weight regain after weight loss. Clin Sci 2103; 124: 231–41.

9. Fothergill E, et al. Persistent Metabolic Adaptation 6 Years After “The Biggest Loser” Competition.Obesity 2016; 24(8): 1612–19.

Monica C. Skarulis1, Mary Walter1, Peter J. Walter1, and Kevin D. Hall

10. Dhurandhar N. Stop the patient blame game: what actually causes obesity. Available at https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/909500. Accessed September 2019.

14. Bray G, et al. The Science of Obesity Management: An Endocrine Society Scientific Statement. Obesity Rev 2018; 39; 79-132

18. Obesity: Risk factors, complications, and strategies for sustainable long‐term weight management

19. Moussa A, et al. Mortality of the Severely Obese. Ann Surg 2019; 269: 1087–91.

15. Obesity prevention and management Position statement February 2019.

24. ANZOS and ADS. 2019. The Australian Obesity Management Algorithm. Available at: http://anzos.com/assets/Obesity-Management-Algorithm-18.10.2016.pdf. Accessed September 2019.

25. RACGP Smoking, nutrition, alcohol, physical activity (SNAP): A population health guide to behavioural risk factors in general practice, 2nd edition. Melbourne: Available at https://www.racgp.org.au/FSDEDEV/media/documents/Clinical%20Resources/Guidelines/SNAP-guideline.pdf. Accessed December 2019.

27. MOH Book to find localized data for Saudi about the BMI and Guidance to Weight loss