INVEST IN PATIENTS’ LIVES

$358,000 INITIAL COST([FOOTNOTE=*Based on financial models incorporating actual data from length-of-stay reductions at Johns Hopkins. Lord RK, Mayhew CR, Korupolu R, et al. ICU early physical rehabilitation programs: financial modeling of cost savings. Crit Care Med. 2013 Mar;41(3):717–724. doi: 10.1097/CCM.0b013e3182711de2],[ANCHOR=],[LINK=]) $818,000 NET SAVINGS1*

Early mobility is a paradigm shift, and the changes required to implement it require financial and managerial support. Beginning a mobility program might require:

  • Hiring additional staff
  • Procuring equipment
  • Sourcing educational and training materials1

These investments in patients’ lives can reap benefits for the hospital, too.

SUPPORTING AN EARLY MOBILITY PROGRAM IN YOUR ICU

Administrators have a unique behind-the-scenes role in establishing and supporting an early mobility program.

From making the initial business case to helping different clinical roles gel into a true inter-professional team, administrators lay the groundwork for staff empowerment.

With administrative support, ICU clinicians can help their patients RISE. 

CALCULATE THE BENEFITS FOR YOUR HOSPITAL

Input some of your own data and see how an early mobility program might benefit your hospital. 

Every hospital is different. They have different patient populations, different specialties, different expenses. The best way to see if an early mobility program will benefit your hospital is with your own numbers. 

MAKE THE CASE FOR EARLY MOBILITY

With any paradigm shift, stakeholders may want supporting evidence. Wake Forest University Hospital, Johns Hopkins Hospital, and the University of California San Francisco Medical Center have implemented early mobility programs using the Institute for Healthcare Improvement framework. All three hospitals reduced ICU length-of-stay and related costs.([FOOTNOTE=*Net cost savings occurred when implementing early mobility as a quality improvement initiative using the Healthcare Improvement framework. Engel HJ, Needham DM, Morris PE, Gropper MA. ICU early mobilization: from recommendation to implementation at three medical centers. Crit Care Med. 2013;41:S69–S80. doi: 10.1097/CCM.0b013e3182a240d5],[ANCHOR=],[LINK=])

OVERCOME BARRIERS TO MOBILITY

50% of barriers to early mobility programs are not related to patient health([FOOTNOTE=Dubb R, Nydahl P, Hermes C, et al. Barriers and strategies for early mobilization of patients in intensive care units. Ann Am Thorac Soc. 2016;13(5):724–730. doi: 10.1513/AnnalsATS.201509-586CME],[ANCHOR=],[LINK=])

Of the many reported barriers to implementing an early mobility program, half are structural, cultural, or procedural — not related to the patient’s physical condition.3 Administrators can address:

  • Limited staff and time constraints — with increased staffing and revised scheduling
  • Limited equipment — with procurement
  • Inadequate staff training — with training resources
  • Lack of mobility culture — by prioritizing mobility3