Uncontrolled hypertension (high blood pressure) increases the risk of heart attack, stroke, and heart and kidney failure.

HYPERTENSION

UNDERSTANDING A HEALTH CRISIS

In the U.S., 45% of all adults have hypertension, or 108 million people.1 Fully 75% of U.S. hypertensive adults do not have their blood pressure under control.1 In fact, rates of control are actually decreasing among those taking anti-hypertensive medication.2

Most important, uncontrolled hypertension increases the risk of heart attack, stroke, and heart and kidney failure.3–5

Learn more about hypertension and treatments to help your patients manage this condition.

EXPLORE RESOURCES

Raising Awareness of Hypertension

pdf Raising Awareness of Hypertension (.pdf)

Resources to help promote awareness

1.5MB

pdf Hypertension Infographic (.pdf)

Health crisis global statistics

119KB

FURTHER YOUR KNOWLEDGE

jpg CDC Hypertension Control Change Package (.jpg)

Resources to help hypertension control

196KB

GET PACKAGE

Hypertension Quiz

Test your hypertension IQ.

Reveal LINQ™ Insertable Cardiac Monitor by Medtronic can help detect and treat syncope faster than conventional monitoring.

Syncope

EARLY DIAGNOSIS CAN SAVE LIVES6

Cardiac syncope increases risk of sudden cardiac death.6 Consider:
 
  • 30-day conventional monitoring misses 84.5% of AF7* and this strategy would have missed 74% of syncope7*
  • 3.6x more likely to reach a diagnosis with an insertable cardiac monitor (ICM) vs. conventional care8

  • ICMs have a positive impact on the overall survival of unexplained syncope patients with recurrent symptoms9

ICMs can help you detect and treat syncope faster than conventional monitoring.10–13

society guidelines

Recommend an ICM for patients with syncope of suspected arrhythmic etiology

EXPLORE RESOURCES

jpg SYNCOPE BROCHURE (.jpg)

How ICMs help determine syncope cause

109KB

png Suspected AF Brochure (.png)

How ICMs can help detect suspected AF

262KB

Photo of Evolut platform by Medtronic for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) to improve patient survival rates.

SYMPTOMATIC SEVERE AORTIC STENOSIS

AN URGENT EVALUATION IS EVERYTHING

Once a patient develops symptomatic severe aortic stenosis (SSAS), the average survival is two years without treatment.14 Annually, 250,000 people in the U.S. are diagnosed with SSAS,15–23 but:
 
  • 48% of those patients are undertreated15–24
  • which means 120,000 remain untreated22

Aortic valve replacement, such as transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), can help improve patient survival rates.25
 
Updated ACC/AHA Valvular Heart Disease Guidelines demonstrate that TAVR is an increasingly accepted alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) for many patients.

society guidelines

Updated ACC/AHA Heart Valve Guidelines recommend that patients with severe valvular heart disease should be evaluated by a multidisciplinary heart valve team when intervention is considered.27

EXPLORE RESOURCES

pdf Diagnosing ssAS (.pdf)

Training Presentation

1.4MB

pdf Aortic Stenosis TAVR Brochure (.pdf)

Information about SSAS and treatment options

3.2MB

Cobalt™ XT DR ICD MRI SureScan™ can increase effectiveness of patient treatment. View Medtronic’s ICD and CRT-D portfolio.

HEART FAILURE

COMPLEMENTARY THERAPIES CAN IMPROVE OUTCOMES

Heart failure is a growing problem worldwide, and 670,000 new cases are diagnosed annually in the United States alone.28 In addition to a decreased quality of life, activity restrictions, and anxiety, heart failure is deadly with a 50% mortality rate at five years.29
 
Guideline-directed medical therapy (GDMT) alone may not yield the best results.
 
Complementary devices, such as implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) can increase the effectiveness of your patient’s treatment program.30, 31
 
Learn more about our ICD and CRT-D portfolio.

society guidelines

Indications a patient may benefit from co-management with an EP.33

EXPLORE RESOURCES

Clinical Evidence

Supporting clinical data of ICD and CRT-D therapies
pdf CRT Patient Selection Tip Card (.pdf)

Indications of HF patients who may benefit from CRT

251KB

EMPOWERING YOU TO DO MORE

We go beyond innovative products and solutions. By joining forces with others, we’re building a technology infrastructure that makes it easier for providers like you to identify life-threatening conditions and manage patients from diagnosis, to referral, to treatment. This includes:

VIRTUAL COLLABORATION

The VitalEngine™* referral network helps enable greater communication across teams and helps close the patient care loop between facilities.

SMARTER DIAGNOSES

Mpirik’s Cardiac Intelligence™* software uses artificial intelligence to automate disease screening to help make it easier to identify valvular heart disease patients.

*

Based on Kaplan-Meier estimates.

1

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Control Hypertension. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Surgeon General; 2020.

2

Muntner P, Hardy ST, Fine LJ, et al. Trends in Blood Pressure Control Among U.S. Adults With Hypertension, 1999-2000 to 2017-2018. JAMA. 2020;324(12):1190–1200. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.14545

3

World Health Organization. A global brief on hypertension: Silent Killer, global public health crisis. WHO2013. http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/ 10665/79059/W?sequence=1.

4

Whelton P, Carey R, Aronow W, et. al. 2017 ACC/AHA/AAPA/ABC/ACPM/AGS/APhA/ASH/ASPC/NMA/PCNA Guideline for the Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Management of High Blood Pressure in Adults: A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines. Originally published 13 Nov 2017 https://doi.org/10.1161/HYP.0000000000000065. Hypertension. 2018;71:e13–e115.

5

Messerli FH, Williams B, Ritz E. Essential hypertension. Lancet. 2007 Aug 18;370(9587):591-603.

6

Brugada R, et al. (eds). Clinical Approach to Sudden Cardiac Death Syndromes. London: Springer-Verlag; 2010.

7

Rogers J, et al. Abstract 272: Sensitivity of Conventional Monitoring Strategies to Diagnose Patients With Pause Arrhythmias Relative to Insertable Cardiac Monitors. 2020 AHA QCOR Abstract.

8

Brignole M, Moya A, de Lange FJ, et al. 2018 ESC Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of syncope. Eur Heart J. Published online March 19, 2018.

9

Perings C, Wolf C, Wilk A, et al. Do implantable loop recorders impact the survival of patients with recurrent unexplained syncope? J Comp Ef Res. 10.2217/ cer-2020-0242.

10

Farwell DJ, Freemantle N, Sulke N. The clinical impact of implantable loop recorders in patients with syncope. Eur Heart J. February 2006;27(3):351-356.

11

Edvardsson N, Frykman V, van Mechelin R, et al. Use of an implantable loop recorder to increase the diagnostic yield in unexplained syncope: results from the PICTURE registry. Europace. February 2011;13(2):262-269.

12

Brignole M, Sutton R, Menozzi C, et al. Early application of an implantable loop recorder allows effective specific therapy in patients with recurrent suspected neurally mediated syncope. European Heart Journal, Volume 27, Issue 9, 1 May 2006, Pages 1085–1092, https://doi.org/10.1093/eurheartj/ehi842

13

Solbiati M, Casazza G, Dipaola F, et al. The diagnostic yield of implantable loop recorders in unexplained syncope: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Int J Cardiol. March 15, 2017;231:170-176.

14

Ross J Jr, Braunwald E. Aortic stenosis. Circulation. July 1968; 38(1 Suppl):61-67.

15

STS Adult Cardiac Database. 2010 Harvest, Isolated AVR.

16

Bach DS, Cimino N, Deeb GM. Unoperated patients with severe aortic stenosis. J Am Coll Cardiol. November 13, 2007;50(20):2018-2019.

17

Pellikka PA, Sarano ME, Nishimura RA, et al. Outcome of 622 adults with asymptomatic, hemodynamically significant aortic stenosis during prolonged follow- up. Circulation. June 21, 2005;111(24):3290-3295.

18

Charlson E, Legedza AT, Hamel MB. Decision-making and outcomes in severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. J Heart Valve Dis. May 2006;15(3):312-321.

19

Nkomo VT, Gardin JM, Skelton TN, Gottdiener JS, Scott CG, Enriquez-Sarano M. Burden of valvular heart diseases: a population-based study. Lancet. September 16, 2006;368(9540):1005-1011.

20

Lindroos M, Kupari M, Heikkilä J, Tilvis R. Prevalence of aortic valve abnormalities in the elderly: an echocardiographic study of a random population sample. J Am Coll Cardiol. April 1993;21(5):1220-1225.

21

Mack MJ, Brennan JM, Brindis R, et al. Outcomes following transcatheter aortic valve replacement in the United States. JAMA. November 20, 2013;310(19):2069-2077.

22

Medtronic data on file #1.

23

lung B, Baron G, Butchart EG, et al. A prospective survey of patients with valvular heart disease in Europe: The Euro Heart Survey on Valvular Heart Disease. Eur Heart J. July 2003;24(13):1231-1243.

24

Bavaria JE. TAVR Update: New Insights and Perspectives from the U.S. National STS/ACC TVT Registry. Available from STS National Database.

25

Leon MB, Smith CR, Mack M, Miller DC, et al. Transcatheter aortic-valve implantation for aortic stenosis in patients who cannot undergo surgery. N Engl J Med. 2010; 363(17):1597-607.

26

Active Living Awareness Initiative Survey. Survey included 3400 respondents. Available at: Heart-Valve-Surgery.com.

27

Otto CM, Nishimura RA, Bonow RO. et al. 2020 ACC/AHA Guideline for the Management of Patients With Valvular Heart Disease: Executive Summary: A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Joint Committee on Clinical Practice Guidelines. Circulation. Published online December 17. 2020.

28

Ambrosy AP, Fonarow GC, Butler J, et al. The global health and economic burden of hospitalizations for heart failure: lessons learned from hospitalized heart failure registries. J Am Coll Cardiol. April 1, 2014;63(12):1123-1133.

29

Writing Group Members, Mozafarian D, Benjamin EJ, et al. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics-2016 Update: A Report From the American Heart Association. Circulation. January 26, 2016;133(4):e38-e360.

30

Tang A, et al. N Engl J Med. 2010;363:2385-2395.

31

Linde C, et al. JACC. 2008;52:1834-1843.

32

Bristow MR, Saxon LA, Boehmer J, et al. Cardiac-resynchronization therapy with or without an implantable defibrillator in advanced chronic heart failure. N Engl J Med. May 20, 2004;350(21):2140-2150.

33

Yancy CW, Jessup M, Bozkurt B, et al. 2013 ACCF/AHA guideline for the management of heart failure: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force On Practice Guideline. J Am Coll Cardiol. October 15, 2015;62(16):e147-e239.

All rights reserved. Medtronic, Medtronic logo and Further, Together are trademarks of Medtronic. ™* Third party brands are trademarks of their respective owners. All other brands are trademarks of a Medtronic company.

Disclaimer: This page may include information about products that may not be available in your region or country. Please consult the approved indications for use. Content on specific Medtronic products is not intended for users in markets that do not have authorization for use.