COMMON

COMMON

Hospital acquired respiratory complications have risen over the last 2 years with a 52% increase in private hospital separations with respiratory failure *,2,3
 

COMMON

The incidence of post-operative  pulmonary complications in abdominal surgery is up to 39%4

COMMON

As many as one third of patients who have a rapid response call while in hospital have sepsis.5

COSTLY

COSTLY

Hospital acquired respiratory complication had a 19% higher cost compared to non-hospital acquired respiratory complication episode in Australia.6 

COSTLY

Activity based funding (ABF)  will be subject to a  reduction in funding amount up to 16% where a hospital admission has been complicated by a preventable HAC.7

COSTLY

Post-operative pulmonary complications prolong length of stay by up to 40%.8

HARMFUL & PREVENTABLE

HARMFUL & PREVENTABLE

Acute respiratory problems are among the most frequent post-operative causes of death.9

HARMFUL & PREVENTABLE

Hospital acquired respiratory conditions are potentially preventable.10

HARMFUL & PREVENTABLE

Early intervention can also minimise the occurrence of adverse events such as cardiac arrest & reduce mortality.11 

  • * AIHW definition for hospital separations: An episode of care for an admitted patient, which can be a total hospital stay (from admission to discharge, transfer or death) or a portion of a hospital stay beginning or ending in a change of type of care (for example, from acute to rehabilitation). Separation also means the process by which an admitted patient completes an episode of care either by being discharged, dying, transferring to another hospital or by changing type of care. The OECD HCQI specifications refer to admissions; however, Australia’s data are for separations.


  • 1. Calculated through AIHW data tables of 2014-15 (Table 8.8.) and 2015-16 (Table 8.5). References 4 and 5. [Accessed December 2017]
    (https://www.aihw.gov.au/getmedia/a64c243f-7c69-4107-a50a-015f94b17b4c/19860.pdf.aspx?inline=true)  (https://www.aihw.gov.au/getmedia/acee86da-d98e-4286-85a4-52840836706f/aihw-hse-201.pdf.aspx?inline=true) 

  • 3. AIHW Data tables for 2015-16. Available from: https://www.aihw.gov.au/getmedia/074c70fc-c9b7-4fd8-9c7e-4e9f1291b67e/APC-1516-Chapter-8.xls.aspx  [Accessed December 2017]

  • 4. Haines KJ, Skinner EH, Berney S (2013) Association of postoperative pulmonary complications with delayed mobilisation following major abdominal surgery: an observational cohort study. Physiotherapy 99(2):119–125.
    Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031940612000831?via%3Dihub [Accessed November 2017]

  • 5. (Health Quality & Safety Commission New Zealand, 2018). Available at: https://www.hqsc.govt.nz/assets/Deteriorating-Patient/PR/Factsheet_-_Patient_deterioration_and_sepsis.pdf [Accessed March 2018]

  • 6. The Independent Hospital Pricing Authority. Available at: https://www.ihpa.gov.au/sites/g/files/net636/f/risk_adjustment_model_for_hospital_acquired_complications_-_technical_specifications_v1.0_july_2017_pdf.pdf  [Accessed November 2017]

  • 7. The Independent Hospital Pricing Authority. Available at: https://www.ihpa.gov.au/sites/g/files/net636/f/risk_adjustment_model_for_hospital_acquired_complications_-_technical_specifications_v1.0_july_2017_pdf.pdf  [Accessed November 2017]

  • 8. Reeve J., Denehy L., Stiller K.. The physiotherapy management of patients undergoing thoracic surgery: a survey of current practice in Australia and New Zealand, Physiother Res Int , 2007, vol. 12 (pg. 59-71)

  • 9. Along with the cardiac cases. Australian and New Zealand Audit of Surgical Mortality National Report 2016. Available at: https://issuu.com/entegy/docs/racs_anzasm_national_report_2016_-_ [Accessed November 2017]

  • 10. Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Healthcare. Available at: https://www.safetyandquality.gov.au/our-work/indicators/potentially-preventable-hospitalisations-and-potentially-avoidable-deaths-in-australia/[Accessed December 2017]

  • 11.Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care. National consensus statement: essential elements for recognising and responding to acute physiological deterioration second edition. Sydney, ACSQHC. 2017.
    Available at: https://www.safetyandquality.gov.au/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/National-Consensus-Statement-clinical-deterioration_2017.pdf [Accessed January 2018]