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LEARN ABOUT VENOUS LEG ULCERS VENOUS REFLUX DISEASE

Understanding is the key to better healthcare.

ABOUT VENOUS LEG ULCERS

Healthy leg veins have valves that keep blood flowing to the heart. Venous reflux disease develops when the valves stop working properly and allow blood to flow backward (i.e., reflux) and pool in the lower leg veins, causing pressure on the skin that can potentially lead to an ulcer.

Venous reflux disease is a progressive medical condition and if left untreated, may worsen over time and develop into a more serious form of venous disease called chronic venous insufficiency (CVI).1

If CVI is left untreated, legs can sometimes develop painful sores or wounds on the skin’s surface called ulcers. Ulcers may indicate a more severe and progressive state of the disease.¹ Normally ulcers appear near the ankles or lower leg and are brought on from the increased build-up of fluid and blood pressure from veins affected by CVI.1

  • 70%-90% of lower extremity ulcers are venous2,3
  • Venous ulcers are the most common chronic wounds treated in many wound care centers4
  • More than half of venous ulcers treated are recurrent ulcerations5
Healthy and Diseased Leg Veins

Due to pain, mobility limitations and other consequences, venous leg ulcers have been associated with increased rates of depression and substantial decreases in patient quality of life.6,7,8


IMPROVED CLINICAL OUTCOMES

Compared to compression therapy alone, minimally invasive treatments addressing the underlying cause of venous ulcers may:

  • Aid in ulcer healing in patients with chronic venous insufficiency9
  • Reduce ulcer reccurence10
  • Improve quality of life9,10


1

Eberhardt R, J Raffetto. Chronic Venous Insufficiency. Circulation. 2005;111:2398-2409.

2

Thomas F. O’Donnell Jr et al. Management of venous leg ulcers; Clinical practice guidelines of the Society for Vascular Surgery and the American Venous Forum. J Vasc Surg 2014;60:3S-59S.

3

Proebstle TM, Alm BJ, Gockeritz O, et al. Five-year results from the prospective European multicentre cohort study on radiofrequency segmental thermal ablation for incompetent great saphenous veins. Br J Surg. Feb 2015;102(3):212-218.

4

Rice J (2014). Burden of venous leg ulcers in the United States. Journal of Medical Economics. 17(5), 347-356.

5

The Outpatient Wound Clinic Market 2013 Report and Analytics, Net Health Analytics (2010-2012 claims data).

6

Valencia IC, Falabella A, Kirsner RS, et al. Chronic venous insufficiency and venous leg ulceration. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2001;44:401-21.

7

Phillips T, Stanton B, Provan A, et al. A study of the impact of leg ulcers on quality of life: financial, social, and psychologic implications. J Am Acad Dermatol. 1994;31:49-53.

8

Green J, Jester R. Health-related quality of life and chronic venous leg ulceration: part 1. Wound Care 2009;December:S12-S17.

9

Harlander-Locke, et al. The impact of ablation of incompetent superficial and perforator veins on ulcer healing rates, J Vasc Surg 55:458-64 (2012).

10

Harlander-Locke, et al. Combined treatment with compression therapy and ablation of incompetent superficial and perforating veins reduces ulcer recurrence in patients with CEAP 5 venous disease, J Vasc Surg; 55:446-50 (2012).