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VENASEAL CLOSURE SYSTEM OUR TREATMENTS

Find relief from vein disease with the VenaSeal™ closure system.

VenaSeal Closure System

Legs before and 3 months after VenaSeal procedure

Individual results may vary.

Images courtesy of Dr. Kathleen Gibson.

Nonthermal vein closure

The VenaSeal™ system delivers a small amount of a specially formulated medical adhesive to seal — or close — the diseased vein, rerouting blood to nearby healthy veins, which provides symptom relief.

A more comfortable experience

  • Simple, outpatient procedure
  • No tumescent anesthesia
  • Less pain and bruising than thermal ablation1,2
  • Faster recovery time than thermal ablation1,2
  • Compression stockings not needed after the procedure*2,3

More than 100,000 patients have been treated with the VenaSeal closure system around the world.

HOW IT WORKS

Venaseal Procedure Step 1

Step 1: Adhesive Placed

VenaSeal adhesive is placed in the vein via small catheter.

Venaseal Procedure Step 2

Step 2: Pressure Applied

Pressure is applied to the leg to help seal the vein.

Venaseal Procedure Step 3

Step 3: Catheter Removed

The small catheter is removed from the vein.

Venaseal Procedure Step 4

Step 4: Bandage Applied

A bandage is applied to cover the wound.

Venous Reflux: How It's Treated

Learn more about our treatments for varicose veins.
More information (see more)Less information (see less)

*

Some patients may benefit from the use of compression stockings post-procedure.


Information on this site should not be used as a substitute for talking with your doctor. Always talk with your doctor about diagnosis and treatment information.

1

Morrison N, et al. Randomized Trial Comparing Cyanoacrylate Embolization and Radiofrequency Ablation for Incompetent Great Saphenous Veins (VeClose). J Vasc Surg. 2015;61(4):985–994.

2

Proebstle, T.M. The European Multicenter Study on Cyanoacrylate Embolization of Refluxing Great Saphenous Veins without Tumescent Anesthesia and without Compression Therapy. Results presented at Charing Cross; 2016; London, UK.

3

Almeida, J.I., et al. Thirty-sixth-Month Follow-up of First-in-human Use of Cyanoacrylate adhesive for treatment of saphenous vein incompetence. Journal of Vasc Surg: Venous and Lymphatic Disorders. Published Online: 2 June 2017.