How PTNM Works PTNM FOR SENIOR LIVING RESIDENTS

RESET. RESTORE.* REGAIN CONTROL.

ptnm-patient-receiving-therapy-nuro-system

Medtronic Bladder Control Therapy delivered by the NURO™ system restores* bladder function by stimulating the tibial nerve through an acupuncture-like needle placed near your ankle.

The medical term for this therapy is percutaneous tibial neuromodulation, or PTNM. This name comes from what the therapy does: it stimulates the tibial nerve, which is located in your leg where the tibia (shinbone) connects to the ankle. The tibial nerve connects to other nerves responsible for bladder control.


THE FIRST 12 WEEKS

PTNM is delivered during a 30-minute session, once a week for 12 weeks. By the end of the 12 weeks, you’ll know how well the therapy works for you.


ONGOING MAINTENANCE THERAPY

Following your initial treatment of 12 weekly sessions, you can continue treatment with maintenance therapy. Maintenance sessions are every three to four weeks, rather than weekly.


PROVEN TO SIGNIFICANTLY IMPROVE overactive bladder SYMPTOMS

This therapy is proven to significantly improve the symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB), reducing urgency-frequency and daily urge incontinence episodes.1,2

The most common side effects of PTNM are temporary and include mild pain and skin inflammation at or near the stimulation site.


KEY POINTS FOR FAMILY MEMBERS

  • PTNM, delivered by the NURO system, is a safe, effective, and proven treatment for your loved one.
  • PTNM is delivered during a 30-minute session, once a week for 12 weeks, in your loved one’s living space.
  • Maintenance sessions are once every three to four weeks.
  • This therapy is proven to significantly improve the symptoms of OAB, reducing urgency-frequency and daily urge incontinence episodes.1,2

*

Restored bladder function is defined as a measurable reduction in urinary frequency and/or urinary incontinence episodes following PTNM treatment.


1

Peters KM, Macdiarmid SA, Woolridge LS, et al. Randomized trial of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation versus extended-release tolterodine: results from the overactive bladder innovative therapy trial. J Urol. 2009;182(3):1055-1061.

2

Peters KM, Carrico DJ, Perez-Marrero RA, et al. Randomized trial of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation versus sham efficacy in the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome: results from the SUmiT trial. J Urol. 2010;183(4):1438-1443.