WHAT IS OVERACTIVE BLADDER? PTNM FOR SENIOR LIVING RESIDENTS

OVERACTIVE BLADDER IS A COMMON AND TREATABLE CONDITION

Overactive bladder (OAB) is a common condition that prevents you from controlling when and how much you urinate. If you have OAB, you might experience one or more of the following:

  • Urgency — the sudden sensation of needing to use the bathroom
  • Frequency — using the bathroom more than 8 times per day
  • Urge Incontinence — unexpected small or large leaks

TREAT YOURSELF TO MORE RELIEF

Senior woman sitting in chair

Actual resident not pictured

If you have bladder control issues, you’re not alone. Millions of people in senior living facilities are in the same situation. In fact, more than 70% of long-term care residents are not in complete control of their urinary bladder function.1

OAB is not a normal part of aging. It’s a treatable condition. And there is a safe and effective way to treat it — right where you live.


TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR OAB

Medications known as anticholinergics are a common treatment option for OAB. However, if you’re already taking drugs for other medical conditions, you may not be a candidate for OAB medication due to possible interactions with your current medications.2,3

A therapy called percutaneous tibial neuromodulation (PTNM), delivered by the NUROTM system, can help you take back control of your bladder — and your life. It doesn’t cause side effects* like medications can.4


KEY POINTS FOR FAMILY MEMBERS

  • While OAB is not life threatening, urinary incontinence can lead to more serious health risks for your loved one, including urinary tract infections, poor sleep, skin problems, and falls.4
  • OAB can also decrease quality of life. It’s common for people living with OAB to worry about accidents, which can lead to limiting activities and avoiding social situations.4
  • There is a safe, proven, and effective way to treat OAB, right where your loved one lives – a therapy called PTNM, delivered by the NURO system.

*

The most common side effects of PTNM are temporary and include mild pain or skin inflammation at or near the stimulation site.


1

Gorina Y, Schappert S, Bercovitz A, et al. Prevalence of incontinence among older Americans. Vital Health Stat 3. 2014;(36):1-33

2

Gray S, Anderson M, Dublin S et al. Cumulative Use of Strong Anticholinergics and Incident Dementia. JAMA Intern Med. 2015;175(3):401-407.

3

Campanelli CM. American Geriatrics Society updated Beers Criteria for potentially inappropriate medication use in older adults: The American Geriatrics Society 2012 Beers Criteria update expert panel. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2012 April;60(4):616–631.

4

CMS Manual System. Department of Health & Human Services. Dec 2016. Pgs. 291-326.