WHY TREAT OAB NOW? PTNM FOR SENIOR LIVING RESIDENTS

TAKE BACK CONTROL

OAB can limit your social life1, making it difficult to share meals, visit friends and family, and stay active in your community. Urinary incontinence also brings serious health risks like urinary tract infections, poor sleep, skin problems, and falls.1


TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR OAB

Medication is a common treatment option for OAB. However, if you’re already taking drugs for other medical conditions, you may not be a candidate for OAB medication due to possible interactions with your current medications.2,3

Older woman smiling

Actual resident not pictured

The side effects associated with anticholinergics may be more pronounced in older adults. Research has suggested that anticholinergic use might be associated with an increased risk for dementia and older adults may be more sensitive to anticholinergic effects in the central nervous system.3,4

A therapy called percutaneous tibial neuromodulation (PTNM), delivered by the NUROTM system,  can help you take back control of your bladder — and your life. It doesn’t cause side effects* like medications can.1 And the therapy can be administered right where you live.


KEY POINTS FOR FAMILY MEMBERS

Long-term care facilities have commonly managed overactive bladder through scheduled bathroom visits with a nurse’s assistance. One of the symptoms of overactive bladder is nocturia, or the need to wake and pass urine at night. Both benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and OAB are associated with nocturia, which is often the prevailing factor leading to nighttime falls and fractures.5

Other data that point to the need to treat OAB:

  • 60% of nursing home residents fall each year.5
  • A common urologic condition associated with falls is overactive bladder. 5

Treating OAB, rather than just managing it, provides freedom and independence for your loved one.


*

The most common side effects of PTNM are temporary and include mild pain or skin inflammation at or near the stimulation site.


1

CMS Manual System. Department of Health & Human Services. Dec 2016. Pgs. 291-326.

2

Campanelli CM. American Geriatrics Society updated Beers Criteria for potentially inappropriate medication use in older adults: The American Geriatrics Society 2012 Beers Criteria update expert panel. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2012 April;60(4):616–631.

3

Gray S, Anderson M, Dublin S et al. Cumulative Use of Strong Anticholinergics and Incident Dementia. JAMA Intern Med. 2015;175(3):401-407.

4

Campbell N, Boustani M, Limbil T, et al. The cognitive impact of anticholinergics: a clinical review. Clin Interv Aging. 2009;4:225-233.

5

Soliman Y, Meyer R, Baum N. Falls in the Elderly Secondary to Urinary Symptoms. Reviews in Urology. 2016;18(1):28-32.