IMPACT OF OAB PTNM IN SENIOR LIVING FACILITIES

STOP MANAGING SYMPTOMS, START TREATING THE DISEASE

Overactive bladder (OAB) is a common condition in the elderly, affecting nearly 3 out of 4 long-term care residents,1 but it's not a normal part of aging. It is, however, treatable.

Long-term care facilities spend significant time helping residents who have incontinence. Typically, this means managing the issue with adult undergarments and timed voiding — rather than treatment.

As I started caring for individuals with incontinence...and watching staff in long-term care settings...I realized what a tremendous effect this condition has on people, families, and health professionals.

Dr. Joseph Ouslander Former Director of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology at Emory University
and Past-President of the American Geriatrics Society

HIGH STAKES IN SENIOR LIVING FACILITIES

The annual cost of managing urinary incontinence in senior living facilities is $5.3 billion.

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) F690 requires each resident who is incontinent of urine is identified, assessed, and provided appropriate treatment and services to achieve or maintain as much normal urinary function as possible.2

OAB is an extremely common bladder control condition. And for most people, it is not life-threatening. But for long-term care and assisted living residents, the risks are much more serious. The incontinence associated with OAB may cause changes in skin integrity, skin irritation or breakdown, urinary tract infections, falls, fractures, and sleep disturbances, as well as social withdrawal, embarrassment, loss of dignity, and feelings of isolation.2

The challenges of managing OAB and urinary incontinence also have consequences for senior living facilities:

  • The annual cost of managing urinary incontinence in long-term care facilities is $5.3 billion.3,4
  • More than one-third of long-stay quality measures are impacted by urinary incontinence, which can negatively impact a facility's star rating.5
  • Lower star ratings may in turn lead to lower reimbursement rates.
  • Physical and emotional challenges of managing urinary incontinence can impact quality of life for staff as well as residents.6

PTNM OVERCOMES BARRIERS TO TREATING INCONTINENCE

Current treatments for incontinence caused by OAB present many barriers for senior living facilities and residents, leaving facilities to manage symptoms without treating the underlying issue. But it doesn’t have to be this way.

Percutaneous tibial neuromodulation (PTNM) therapy removes barriers to treatment by providing an opportunity to treat patients in the same facilities where they reside. Give your residents a new option for more control over their symptoms.

Medtronic PTNM Therapy Sequence and Benefits

Dr. Colin Goudelocke outlines the PTNM therapy sequence and describes its benefits for senior living facilities.
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1

Gorina Y, Schappert S, Bercovitz A, et al. Prevalence of incontinence among older Americans. Vital Health Stat 3. 2014;(36):1-33

2

CMS Manual System. Department of Health & Human Services. Dec 2016. Pgs 291-326.

3

Urinary Incontinence in the  Long-Term Care Setting. Clinical Practice Guideline. AMDA. 2012. Pgs1-48

4

Hu TW, Wagner TH, Bentkover JD, et al. Costs of urinary incontinence  and overactive bladder in the  United States: a comparative study.  Urology.  2004 Mar;63(3):461-5.

6

Ouslander, J. Improving Continence Care for Older Adults: From Bedside to Health Policy. J Am GeriatrSoc. 2016; 64(10): 2161-2165.